CfP Visualizing Sustainability

CALL FOR PAPERS

The International Visual Sociology Association invites abstracts for its 34th annual meeting, to be held at Lillehammer University College, Norway, June 22-24, 2016.

Abstracts may address general topics relating to visual methods, theories, and other aspects central to visual sociology and the visual analysis of society and culture, as well as the general theme of the conference, “Visualizing Sustainability. Imagined Futures.”

We encourage submissions from those interested in the visual research and thinking from sociology and related social sciences; communications and media; cultural studies; film and photographic studies; photojournalism and related practices. We encourage those unfamiliar with visual methods and analysis to visually innovate and experiment in their respective substantive specializations. The IVSA is rooted in the discipline of sociology but welcomes participation from a wide range of disciplines.

Preference will be given to presentations that use visual material (images or video).

Specific themes may include but not be limited to the following:

visual methods in the study of sustainability
the visual study of nature and human presence in the world
the visual analysis of environmental problems and crises
the visual dimension of social movements for human sustainability
the visual imagination of a sustainable ecological world

Please note: the list above is suggestive and not exhaustive. As the first conference to address this important theme, we expect a wide range of creative approaches, ideas and presentations, including papers with images, videos, photo essays, multi-media, fine arts and other modes of visual expression.

Information on how to submit is forthcoming on http://www.visualsociology.org. Deadline is January 15, 2016. If your proposal is accepted you will be invited to join the IVSA in order to participate in the conference.

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Visualizing Sustainability: Imagined Futures

IVSA 2016 Annual Conference

June 22-24, 2016 in the town of Lillehammer, Norway. The Conference will be hosted by the Faculty of Social Science at Lillehammer University College.

During the days of June 22 – 24, visual scholars and artists from around the world will gather to share their research and network in paper sessions, workshops, film sessions, exhibitions and social events.

The theme for this conference will be “Visualizing sustainability: Future imaginations.” The conference will take place at Lillehammer University College. Lillehammer is less than two hours by train from Oslo International Airport with direct flights from many cities in and outside Europe.

For this year’s event we ask the visual sociology community and related disciplines to problematize and challenge the concept of environmental sustainability. How can we visualize what sustainability is and what it is not; what are its signs and characteristics? We ask you to use your visual imagination to explore the issues related to sustainability on a local and a global scale.

As is our practice in all IVSA conferences we also welcome generalist submissions dealing with visual methods, theories, and other central issues in visual sociology, as well as visual analyses of society and culture.

 

More information here

Engaging Tactics

Engaging Tactics @ the BSA Annual Conference 2013 in London, Wednesday April 3rd.

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Engaging Tactics is a Goldsmiths PhD initiative exploring the boundaries between sociology and life through multi-sensory, multi-site engagement with publics and participants inside and outside of academia. A series of interventions and round table will continue the discussion during this years the BSA Annual conference.

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Live Sociology // Engaging Tactics ····· 16:30 – 18:00

Roundtable discussion

With: Noortje Marres, Nirmal Puwar, Alison Rooke and Michel Guggenheim (all of Goldsmiths, University of London). Chaired by Anna Bull and Christian v. Wissel.

This roundtable is sounding out the speaking and acting powers of multi-media techniques to collect, analyse, archive, and share ethnographic social research as well as other kinds of social data and materials. Drawing on the interventions and screenings presented within Goldsmith’s open stream ‘Engaging Tactics: Revealing Secrets’ during the first day of this year’s BSA Annual Conference, the discussion will envision possible futures for social research by mapping out Live Sociology from participatory art to digital methods, from curating to eating.

Live Methods, 2013, edited by Les Back and Nirmal Puwar, Sociological Review Monographs Series, will be on display during the Publishers’ reception at 7pm.

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Revealing Secrets // interventions and screenings ····· all day

The venue for the 2013 BSA conference is the grandly mysterious Connaught Rooms, owned by the Freemasons, complete with masonic stars on door handles and secret entrances into the Masonic Lodge next door. ‘Off-the-records,’ in adjacent rooms and (almost) concealed interventions to the conference, Engaging Tactics therefore showcases a sound performance and video screenings that search for ways to talk about and engage with those bodies and lives that keep or are kept away from public.

Interventions and screenings by

Tansy Spinks: sound artist, lecturer at Middlesex University and Camberwell College of Art.

The sound performance Sonic Ritual (equivalent) will play with ideas about secret rituals, using objects and the sounds they make, through microphones, live loops and loudspeakers.

Madli Maruste: PhD candidate, Centre for Urban and Community Research, Goldsmiths.

The video J. is reflecting on the personal story, a story about the loss of identity, belonging and the city, of a former Jewish Rabbi I met in the Old Jewish quarter in Vilnius, Lithuania in 2012.

Kata Halasz: visual artist, PhD candidate in Visual Sociology, Goldsmiths.

Visual wallpaper, composed of an animated gif projected in loop, intertwining the space, time and histories of the Grand Connaught Rooms.

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Curating Research

Working in the emerging fields of Visual and Sensory Sociology implies searching for ways by which visual and sensory research tools and findings can make an intervention in the production of public knowledge. This is, that the visual and sensory means applied during research become productive not just as inspiration, companion or appendix to the written piece, but productive in their own right and speaking their own language. Visual and sensory knowledge – or more generally speaking: creative knowledge – are specific ways of knowing, different to that of intellectual abstraction to which they tend to resist when caught and translated into textual description and interpretation. It is in this light that the practice of curating acquires heightened importance. Curating Research is about handling research (Bolt 2010). It is about listening to and bringing into relation the visual and material qualities inherent in those forms of research that draw on, or develop through, artistic practices. And it is about exploring “curating as a research process” (Wells 2007) that in itself allows sociological enquiry – in all its possible forms, visual-sensory or not – to re-imagine, re-arrange, experiment with and expand its methods and ways of communication (see Puwar and Sharma, “Curating Sociology”, forthcoming).

Thus, if Visual and Sensory Sociology claim to be able to find distinctive approaches into researching the social, they have to find ways how to recognize, maintain and make flourish the uniqueness of such visual-material (creative) knowledge when introducing it into the ‘conventional’ channels of knowledge production in the social sciences. Curating Research shows the potential to be such a way. The medium ‘exhibition’, as a space, way of doing and a set of tools for research, can expand our means by which to challenge the material and sensory relations of the social. And it can help us to engage with publics inside and outside academia by using “other ways of telling” (ibid.).

Curating the city and Curating Research are two interventions that aim at contributing to find such ways. The first being an exhibition about the making of an exhibition and the second being a public talk about the art of exhibition making, both events invite to discuss the possible tools and spaces offered by curatorial practices in order to access, present, put to work and challenge creative research and knowledge.

please have a look and join the discussion.

Curating Research aims at exploring curatorial praxis as the means and stage for artistic research in the social sciences. The public talk asks about the politics and ethics of exhibiting as well as about the possibilities provided by the communication medium ‘exhibition’ to open up new, or different, spaces for thought and action.

As a reference point for the discussion we will draw special – yet not exclusive –attention to the tools and techniques inherent to curatorial practices in the field of critical urban studies. What possibilities emerge through the medium ‘exhibition’ for investigating, thinking, and changing the city?

Curating Research is an initiative by the urban research collective Citámbulos, the architecture collective NMA and Akademie Schloss Solitude. It takes the exhibition Curating the City – an exhibition about curating an exhibition about Mexico City – as an opportunity and spacial-haptic starting point for the discussion.

The public event invites curators, exhibition visitors, social scientists, and all those, who use artistic resources for their research, to reflect on their curatorial tools. It aims at exploring ways in which exhibitions and artistic knowledge production can become methodically firm and critically productive means for intervening in society.

Curating the City addresses the question of how curatorial practice and exhibition space can operate as active thinking spaces within urban research. The exhibition is designed as an open archive and workshop conversation with the interdisciplinary urban research collective Citámbulos whose homonymous project on urban phenomena in Mexico City has been shown in Berlin, Mexico City and Copenhagen (among others) in recent years. By means of a dialogue between specific exhibition pieces, excerpts from the publication Citámbulos: Guide to the Marvels of Mexico City and the collective’s Manifesto, Curating the City invites reflecting on ‘the art of listening’, ‘imagination as method’ and ‘remarking the unremarkable’ of our cities.

Visual Methods Keynote

From 13th to 15th of September 2011 the 2nd International Visual Methods Conference took place at the Open University in Milton Keynes. The conference was a fantastic event, both thanks to a wonderful organisation and thanks to superb line-up of keynote speakers with highly informative interventions. These are now online (http://stadium.open.ac.uk/berrill/) and it is very worthy listening to them (again)…

please follow the links below:

Kat Cizek “The interventionist and participatory methods of HIGHRISE”

Ludmilla Jordanova “Thinking With The Eyes”

Carey Jewitt “A History of Visual Methods”

Visual Activism and Social Justice

Visual Sociology Thematic Group,

International Sociological Association, mid-term conference “Forum on Social Justice and Democratization”
1-4 August 2012, Buenos Aires

CALL FOR PAPERS (submissions by 15 December 2011)

In our sessions, we would like to both create the opportunity for a sociological discussion of the meaning of Visual Activism and Social Justice, and at the same time endeavor to democratize the ways our knowledge and practices are produced and shared. The following sessions are happy to receive your contributions… (detailed descriptions here)

SESSION A: Icons, Models and Drama Queen(s): A Comparative Analysis of the ‘Burqa’ in European and North American Political Visual Cultures

SESSION B: New Media, Videos and Cyber-Activism on Social and Environmental Issues

SESSION C: Culture and Visual Forms of Power: Experiencing Contemporary Spaces of Resistance

SESSION D: Civic Media and Creative Youth Activism in the Middle East (CMCYA-ME)

SESSION E: Cross-Examining Visuals in the Criminal Justice System

SESSION F: Critiquing Participatory Video: Experiences from Around the World

SESSION G: Visual Activism: The (Street) Art of Making Visible Alternative Ways of Seeing the World

SESSION H: Visual Sociology As/Of Activism for Social Justice

SESSION I: Teaching Visual Methods, Learning to become a Visual Sociologist

SESSION J: Visual Representation of Injustice and Exclusion

Anyone interested in presenting a paper should submit an abstract on-line to http://www.isa-sociology.org/buenos-aires-2012.

Second International Visual Methods conference

The Open University, Milton Keynes, UK

13-15 September 2011

The 2nd International Visual Methods Conference invites academics and others who work with visual methods to take part in presentations and discussions, as well as a programme of workshops, viewing a variety of exhibitions and screenings.

More information here

 

Presentations and papers will come under – yet are not restricted to – the following sub-headings:

(a) Visual methods & research design

(b) Participatory visual methods

(c) Visual ethics

(d) Visual culture and visual methods

(e) Visual technology

(f) Approaches to analyzing visual data

(g) Researcher-created visual data

(h) Arts-based visual research methods

(i) Data visualisation