How to do Sociology with…?

Date: 19th March 2015, 4.30-6.30pm, RHB 2.107, Goldsmiths

At Goldsmiths, we practice sociology with a variety of things, from buildings to music and social media. But how do we do this?

Join us for an afternoon of show-and-tell with students and staff of the Goldsmiths’ sociology Department, including:

Bells and whistles | Aidan Kelly

Big Data | Evelyn Ruppert

A Building | Marina da Silva

Coffee | Jess Perriam

Costume|Kat Jungnickel

An Experiment | Michael Guggenheim

Film | Nirmal Puwar

A Mango | Alex Rhys Taylor

Music | Les Back

Postcards | Beckie Coleman

Words | Mariam Motamedi-Fraser

All speakers teach or study on our post-graduate programmes. So if you are thinking of post-graduate study in the area of sociology, come along.

Email sociology.masters@gold.ac.uk to find out more.

To see the poster: Sociology poster 19 March 15

This is Visual Sociology exhibition, September 2014

Some of the first cohort of the MA in Visual Sociology organised an exhibition of work produced over the year.

Photographs by Marina da Silva.

 

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Detail from work by Ali Eisa.

 

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Detail from work by Rose Delcour Min.

 

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Detail from work by Roz Mortimer.

 

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Detail from work by Marina da Silva.

 

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Detail from work by Clare Kileen.

MA Visual Sociology: report on This is Visual Sociology exhibition

In September 2014, some of the first cohort of the Goldsmiths MA in Visual Sociology organised an exhibition of work produced over the year.

Rose Delcour-Min, Ali Eisa, Katie Knapp, Roz Mortimer and Marina da Silva wrote up their reflections on the exhibition, and the MA more generally, for the International Visual Sociology Association newsletter.   

Discussing the title of the exhibition they write:

‘Having initially explored more tentative titles such as Is This Visual Sociology?, and after a year of study in the first Masters programme in Visual Sociology, our confidence in our inventive and sensory methods led us to a bolder statement: This Is Visual Sociology.

The full piece can be viewed here.