CfP Visualizing Sustainability

CALL FOR PAPERS

The International Visual Sociology Association invites abstracts for its 34th annual meeting, to be held at Lillehammer University College, Norway, June 22-24, 2016.

Abstracts may address general topics relating to visual methods, theories, and other aspects central to visual sociology and the visual analysis of society and culture, as well as the general theme of the conference, “Visualizing Sustainability. Imagined Futures.”

We encourage submissions from those interested in the visual research and thinking from sociology and related social sciences; communications and media; cultural studies; film and photographic studies; photojournalism and related practices. We encourage those unfamiliar with visual methods and analysis to visually innovate and experiment in their respective substantive specializations. The IVSA is rooted in the discipline of sociology but welcomes participation from a wide range of disciplines.

Preference will be given to presentations that use visual material (images or video).

Specific themes may include but not be limited to the following:

visual methods in the study of sustainability
the visual study of nature and human presence in the world
the visual analysis of environmental problems and crises
the visual dimension of social movements for human sustainability
the visual imagination of a sustainable ecological world

Please note: the list above is suggestive and not exhaustive. As the first conference to address this important theme, we expect a wide range of creative approaches, ideas and presentations, including papers with images, videos, photo essays, multi-media, fine arts and other modes of visual expression.

Information on how to submit is forthcoming on http://www.visualsociology.org. Deadline is January 15, 2016. If your proposal is accepted you will be invited to join the IVSA in order to participate in the conference.

Visualizing Sustainability: Imagined Futures

IVSA 2016 Annual Conference

June 22-24, 2016 in the town of Lillehammer, Norway. The Conference will be hosted by the Faculty of Social Science at Lillehammer University College.

During the days of June 22 – 24, visual scholars and artists from around the world will gather to share their research and network in paper sessions, workshops, film sessions, exhibitions and social events.

The theme for this conference will be “Visualizing sustainability: Future imaginations.” The conference will take place at Lillehammer University College. Lillehammer is less than two hours by train from Oslo International Airport with direct flights from many cities in and outside Europe.

For this year’s event we ask the visual sociology community and related disciplines to problematize and challenge the concept of environmental sustainability. How can we visualize what sustainability is and what it is not; what are its signs and characteristics? We ask you to use your visual imagination to explore the issues related to sustainability on a local and a global scale.

As is our practice in all IVSA conferences we also welcome generalist submissions dealing with visual methods, theories, and other central issues in visual sociology, as well as visual analyses of society and culture.

 

More information here

This is Visual Sociology exhibition, September 2014

Some of the first cohort of the MA in Visual Sociology organised an exhibition of work produced over the year.

Photographs by Marina da Silva.

 

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Detail from work by Ali Eisa.

 

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Detail from work by Rose Delcour Min.

 

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Detail from work by Roz Mortimer.

 

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Detail from work by Marina da Silva.

 

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Detail from work by Clare Kileen.

MA Visual Sociology: report on This is Visual Sociology exhibition

In September 2014, some of the first cohort of the Goldsmiths MA in Visual Sociology organised an exhibition of work produced over the year.

Rose Delcour-Min, Ali Eisa, Katie Knapp, Roz Mortimer and Marina da Silva wrote up their reflections on the exhibition, and the MA more generally, for the International Visual Sociology Association newsletter.   

Discussing the title of the exhibition they write:

‘Having initially explored more tentative titles such as Is This Visual Sociology?, and after a year of study in the first Masters programme in Visual Sociology, our confidence in our inventive and sensory methods led us to a bolder statement: This Is Visual Sociology.

The full piece can be viewed here.

The Future of Art is Urban

Artistic Research Practices and Methods in Social Sciences

////// 30 May – 14 June 2014 · Enclave (Deptford · South East London)
/////// work by Visual Sociology PhD students from Goldsmiths · curated by Katalin Halász

The Future of Art is Urban blends the borders between art and social science. The exhibition presents a wide range of different social research practices in which knowledge is produced through artistic approaches. Participants use the city as a site of confrontation and interaction and invite our immediate reflections. 

Screen shot 2014-08-18 at 15.54.41

See the website here and the catalogue here.

The exhibition is held in conjunction with the 50th anniversary of Goldsmiths Sociology, and is organised in celebration of the 20 years of the Centre for Urban and Community Research.

Engaging Tactics

Engaging Tactics @ the BSA Annual Conference 2013 in London, Wednesday April 3rd.

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Engaging Tactics is a Goldsmiths PhD initiative exploring the boundaries between sociology and life through multi-sensory, multi-site engagement with publics and participants inside and outside of academia. A series of interventions and round table will continue the discussion during this years the BSA Annual conference.

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Live Sociology // Engaging Tactics ····· 16:30 – 18:00

Roundtable discussion

With: Noortje Marres, Nirmal Puwar, Alison Rooke and Michel Guggenheim (all of Goldsmiths, University of London). Chaired by Anna Bull and Christian v. Wissel.

This roundtable is sounding out the speaking and acting powers of multi-media techniques to collect, analyse, archive, and share ethnographic social research as well as other kinds of social data and materials. Drawing on the interventions and screenings presented within Goldsmith’s open stream ‘Engaging Tactics: Revealing Secrets’ during the first day of this year’s BSA Annual Conference, the discussion will envision possible futures for social research by mapping out Live Sociology from participatory art to digital methods, from curating to eating.

Live Methods, 2013, edited by Les Back and Nirmal Puwar, Sociological Review Monographs Series, will be on display during the Publishers’ reception at 7pm.

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Revealing Secrets // interventions and screenings ····· all day

The venue for the 2013 BSA conference is the grandly mysterious Connaught Rooms, owned by the Freemasons, complete with masonic stars on door handles and secret entrances into the Masonic Lodge next door. ‘Off-the-records,’ in adjacent rooms and (almost) concealed interventions to the conference, Engaging Tactics therefore showcases a sound performance and video screenings that search for ways to talk about and engage with those bodies and lives that keep or are kept away from public.

Interventions and screenings by

Tansy Spinks: sound artist, lecturer at Middlesex University and Camberwell College of Art.

The sound performance Sonic Ritual (equivalent) will play with ideas about secret rituals, using objects and the sounds they make, through microphones, live loops and loudspeakers.

Madli Maruste: PhD candidate, Centre for Urban and Community Research, Goldsmiths.

The video J. is reflecting on the personal story, a story about the loss of identity, belonging and the city, of a former Jewish Rabbi I met in the Old Jewish quarter in Vilnius, Lithuania in 2012.

Kata Halasz: visual artist, PhD candidate in Visual Sociology, Goldsmiths.

Visual wallpaper, composed of an animated gif projected in loop, intertwining the space, time and histories of the Grand Connaught Rooms.

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so what is vis soc all about?

Is it Visual Sociology or Sociology of the Visual (world)? Is it practice or theory? Observation or intervention? Documentary or analysis? Qualitative or quantitative methods? Or both? Or all of it? Is it about perception or about images? Concerned with process and the making of worlds through seeing or with time and space fixed on film or within a combination of zeros and ones? And what about text? Isn’t the layout of each page (and web page) a visual message, too?

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here is a – quickly compiled and not conclusive – list of web pages that wonderfully demonstrate that there is plenty of answers… Have a look yourself:

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And here some thought developed at Goldsmiths… by Les Back (in: Back, Les. 2007. The Art of Listening. Oxford; New York: Berg):

“The quality of the images operates outside of language and the conventions of The Word. Yet, at the same time, there is something to be listened to in these silent portraits. Part of what is compelling about them is that they contain voices that are present yet inaudible. We have to listen to them with our eyes.” (Back, 2007: 100)

“the lens is not always about the control and fixing of subjects. To see photography as merely a governing technology misses the instability and complexity of the drama that unfolds on either side of the lens. […] It is a mistake, I think, to see the lens as only looking one way. […] Cameras in this context are like windows that look out onto the street, and through which the street looks in.” (Back, 2007: 104)

to make sense of these quotes, please have a look at the following images by Anthony Luvera — although not the ones Les Back refers to in his book — at luvera.com